It’s a frog’s life!

IMG_0037

“‘Is the spring coming?’ he said. ‘What is it like?’ …
‘It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine, and things pushing up and working under the earth.’”
—Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

The picture above was the scene that met us last week as we gathered with our friends for our weekly homeschool sports session; as my older children were lost in dodge ball I took a stroll over to the moat of the old castle ruins with my younger children and a few of their friends. The water is still and teaming with life; in a seemingly small, inner city park we’ve witnessed so much beauty through the changing seasons and this day was no different.

Before reaching the dense area of water we could hear the day time croaking and creaking from the army of frogs gathered; I can only imagine how loud and intense the evening sounds must be. The sheer amount of frogs congregated in one area was astonishing; they were moving amongst each other; climbing, nudging, tumbling, competing and yes, mounting – or as many of the children that day beautifully commented, they were ‘hugging’.

Collections of spawn were beginning to form and congeal around these incredible creatures; some drifted towards the bank but it also moved along as the frogs shifted in the water. As the children disappeared to play one by one I was left mesmerised by God’s awesome creative genius and knew I had to come back to photograph the amphibians in greater detail.

IMG_1996

The following day, around the same time my youngest daughter and I returned to the same spot to be met with more than double the amount of frog spawn – this army were hard at work.

We watched quietly, listened to the sounds and took photos with our eyes and camera of these sacred moments of life from the water below us.

We don’t just merely study ponds, water, movement and life; may these late winter observations bring refreshment to our souls and respect for God’s earth and creation. Let’s never think we’ve ‘seen it all before’, may we absorb our observations like a new day, a beautiful sunrise or a moment of reprise in our day to say ‘thank you’ and create a lasting memory.

IMG_1995

The frog by nature is both damp and cold,
Her mouth is large, her belly much will hold;
She sits somewhat ascending, loves to be
Croaking in gardens, though unpleasantly.

John Bunyan

We love these beautiful stories by Angela Sheehan, try to get your hands on a copy of ‘The Frog‘ – a wonderful living story of a frogs life!

51pc+G1oZ3L._SL500_

The Simple Feast

img_9854

We spread an abundant and delicate feast in the programmes and each small guest assimilates what he can – Charlotte Mason (Vol. 6, p. 183).

The delectable ‘feast’ is one of the appeals of a Charlotte Mason Education; the variety of stories and lives and lessons to fill our children’s hearts and minds excites me and brings joy as I plan for their learning days.

After a long summer of adventures, camping, conversations around back yard candles and firelight; after days of late nights and later mornings, unplanned food thrown together, memories from car to beach we’ve kicked off our ninth ‘formal’ learning year this week (because everything is learning right?). I leaned more towards a ‘soft launch’ allowing the children to adjust, orientate and for me to communicate our new course of travel over a few days; then it’s heads down, ears open, hearts ready to soak up what our year may bring.

Despite my slow approach to launching straight into all of our subjects and schedule, in spite of a splattering of summering still humming in the background like a busy worker bee; as I sat and reflected on our day I was overwhelmed by the impact of what I had served up.

So here’s our day, a very normal day but a day where I paid attention to conversation; I noticed voices and opinions, actions and reactions, methods and themes of play and I can heartily say there was no veneer – this was a feasting day!

img_9855

I yell the children downstairs as I finish preparing breakfast to the quiet soundtrack of our beloved British radio favourite ‘Classic FM’; Dave noticed one track was from the film ‘Love actually’ before he left for work.

We gathered around the table and I read ‘Kindness’ by Naomi Shihab Nye and discussed the contrast of sorrow and kindness, heartache and joy and how they are synonymous to each other. We talked about her starting to write poetry at 7. This caught Micah’s attention and he went on to talk about Roald Dahl’s writing hut. Micah later set up a writing table in our garden to write his books. He was inspired to not allow the fact that he is a child hinder him or hold him back from publishing a story…

We then looked at our first Murillo painting; each child narrated and Nyah was the only one to notice the dog in the bottom right hand corner of the painting. We discussed the angel up in the sky on the right hand side being there to signify a miracle, a true work of God. We discussed Roman architecture, disciples, how the angel looked like a unicorn and how there was a possibility of the guy on the balcony being a spy (smile).

We then read from the Bible; we read the beginning of the story of Joshua attempting to enter the Promised Land, going in as spies and Rahab helping them – one child commented on Rahab telling the king that they weren’t there anymore but knowing she had hidden them. Why would she lie?

img_9872

As I read to the children Micah drew his version of Murillo’s painting (unprompted) in pencil.

We read together John 3:16 and committed to memorising it this week.

They bickered – I addressed it; I spoke to them about peace and how to make good choices of when to speak, stay silent, and why not to react to their siblings.

We prayed; everyone prayed.

We then got on with work in the house; folding laundry, wiping down the bathroom, making beds, brushing teeth, emptying and refilling the dishwasher.

Then it was heads down for listening and learning independently (if old enough); I talked through with Nyah and Joel their schedules, books and expectations – they then got on with grammar, copying out poetry and fables, map study, foreign language, reading Shakespeare – the maths launch is tomorrow for the older children.

I orientate Micah with his new schedule and eight year old expectations; he goes on to copy out a quote about nature, begins to study his list of spellings, starts to study a map of Europe and watches an online maths lesson.

Our youngest learner Sienna starts ‘life of fred’ (‘living’ maths) and learns that x always equals x and y always equals y. No matter which way round 5 + 2 is (i.e. 2+5), it will always equals 7.

We read A A Milne poetry together and she chose some ‘beautiful’ words to copy out and add to her homemade flash cards. We read a nature story and looked for more interesting words.

After a group effort of hashing lunch and a pot of tea together we fell straight into our quiet reading half hour; between us we had the pages of Pride and Prejudice, Five children and It (audio), Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, a biography about Louis Pasteur and Krista Tippett’s ‘Becoming Wise’ open and being lapped up.

We also realised we hadn’t quite finished ‘Miracles on Maple Hill’ before the summer break so I read aloud one of the two chapters we have to finish the book.

My younger children interspersed their reading and listening with games, songs, dancing around the garden, playing ‘Hulk’, making potions and being ‘scientists’, Lego and lots and lots of drawing.

Micah scribed a ‘book’ at his writing table and also had a bit of time playing a game on his Kindle fire.

We observed an Orb Weaver spider on a huge web wrapping up a fly, we found honey fungus growing under a tree, we noticed the life cycle of a ladybug was happening on a bush right in our backyard after one of the children spotted a pupae on a leaf.

The September sun was warm enough to play long and hard outside.

14222289_10153721501820800_98206610533837699_n

The day turned into early evening and dinner was prepared; the table was set, Dave came home and together we all breath and eat and connect and converse about our very normal day.

It is the duty of parents to sustain a child’s inner life with ideas as they sustain its body with food – Charlotte Mason

To Walk And To Wonder – Words & Pictures

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 041

Every hour spent in the open is a clear gain, tending to the increase of brain power and bodily vigour, and to the lengthening of life itself – Charlotte Mason

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 047

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 038

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt ― Margaret Atwood

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 036

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 015

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more”
― George Gordon Byron

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 010

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 005

“Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 043

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 138

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature – the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.”  ― Rachel Carson

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 139

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 107

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 084

“…and then, I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?” ― Vincent van Gogh

Why We Nature Journal

Nature journal 1

As soon as he is able to keep it himself, a nature-diary is a source of delight to a child. Every day’s walk gives him something to enter: three squirrels in a larch tree, a jay flying across such a field, a caterpillar climbing up a nettle, a snail eating a cabbage leaf, a spider dropping suddenly to the ground, where he found ground ivy, how it was growing and what plants were growing with it, how bindweed or ivy manages to climb – Charlotte Mason (Vol. 1, p. 54)

Nature study is such a central part of the Charlotte Mason philosophy, allowing our children to be free to experience the great outdoors on a regular basis, to breathe in God’s creation and makes connections of their own is foundational to the methods we use.

Keeping a nature journal or diary is a wonderful way to help our children (and ourselves) deepen the connection with what they have seen and experienced out-of-doors. Nature journaling doesn’t require us to have a degree in fine art, a perfect knowledge of all things in nature or the most expensive tools and paints; nature journaling requires a little bit of time, attention and a lot of heart.

The Four R’s Of Nature Journaling 

Nature Journal 2

We journal to:

REFLECT

Reflecting is a form of asking questions of what we’ve seen and the connections we’ve made; we can make lists of what we’ve observed, copy out sections of poetry or prose that relate to our observations or a short entry on how our time out-of-doors made us feel. Nature study is not a mere page in a science book describing the facts of another living being, nature study is a beautiful opportunity for us to make a connection for life with part of God’s creation.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 130

RECORD

Nature study, especially for our younger children is a wonderful foundation for all scientific study and research. Our journaling process can be the beginnings of learning about the parts of a flower, the life cycle of a frog or the fascinating phases of the moon. Allow your children to develop their own style, fill their pages with wonder and not get too perfectionist about it!

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 041

RESPOND

Our connections with God’s creation can cause a physical, emotional or spiritual reaction (or all three); my heart leaps with joy when I see a baby lamb skip, a spring crocus pushing up through the hard winter ground or the sight of Mr. and Mrs. Blackbird busy in my yard building their nest. Our journal can mark our emotions through the seasons, bring joy and spark gratitude.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 126

REMEMBER

Sketching, tracing, copying, writing or even sticking magazine pictures in our journals mark a seasonal journey of what we’ve observed through the year. What a wonderful, memorable collection of words and images to look back on through the years of our precious lives and our children’s education at home.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 132

Keeping a nature journal has been part of the rhythm of our home educating for the past 8 years but more recently it has become a part of my own personal life; my creative expression as a mother and educator but most importantly as a lover and appreciator of God’s creation.

You can follow my photo journal here on Instagram

 

 

 

 

Ten Top Tips For Winning With Nature Study

NATURE WALK - FEB 035

An environment-based education movement–at all levels of education–will help students realize that school isn’t supposed to be a polite form of incarceration, but a portal to the wider world ― Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods

There are no ‘rules’ when it comes to nature study so you can relax now mama! Charlotte Mason painted a picture through her philosophy, of freedom to learn, education for the heart, mind and soul as well as a wonderful foundation for a whole measure of academic connections that come from ‘merely’ being outside, observing and paying attention.

NICOLE DAY - Books and Coombe 113

NICOLE DAY - Books and Coombe 100

If you haven’t seen it yet, go check out my Periscope broadcasts on nature study, you can watch the replays on Katch.me/leahvboden.

Although Miss Mason especially advised mothers with young children to be outside 4 -5 hours a day (I know…when does the laundry get done right?!), we have to bring her philosophy (a guiding principle) into our 21st century lives and learning. I like to frame the facilitation of nature study in our home around these three guidelines:

  1. Be convinced that being outdoors is vital to their education and character.
  2. Create a daily rhythm which includes it
  3. Instruct, let them BE in nature, then reflect when you get home…not too much talking! 

It is infinitely well worth the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather, to cherish in them, the love of investigation – Charlotte Mason

NICOLE DAY - Books and Coombe 087

Ten Top Tips

NICOLE DAY - Books and Coombe 064

  1. Put down the nature study books and just get outside!
  2. Start with your garden or backyard – can your children name the trees and flowers, bird and insects that appear in your space everyday?
  3. Be prepared – nothing worse than being 5 minutes into your walk when your 5-year-old starts complaining of cold feet and being hungry! Wear wool socks, wellies, bring a backpack with snacks, bring little bags so your children can collect ‘treasures’.
  4. Take LOTS of photos – you can reflect when you get home
  5. As you’re reflecting on your walk make a list of sensory experiences; ask your children (and write down) what they saw, heard, smelt, tasted (!) and felt.
  6. DON’T SWEAT THE SKETCH! For some children It takes time to develop a passion and skills to draw ‘what they saw’ – don’t cry over their wrong use of paints or their incessant desire to paint trees blue! Check out my friend Lynn’s post on nature journaling if you want to take steps towards bettering what you do…but take your time!
  7. You have my full permission to use tracing paper! Taking steps towards drawing from nature requires confidence and enjoyment. If you have children who breakdown over the thought of sketching, give them a beautiful nature book, a pencil and some tracing paper and let them go to town…and watch the smile appear back on their face (and yours)! I encourage my children to free-draw one of their traced pictures at the end of the week to help move them forward, go on – give it a go!
  8. Create a nature table, cupboard, tray or small space in your home or homeschool space to display the treasures from nature that your children bring home – remember, you’re creating an atmosphere!
  9. Be intentional. We walk our dog everyday and take a family walk on a Saturday afternoon, but once a week I take my children on an ‘intentional’ nature walk where I give instruction, then let them be in nature, then we reflect when we get home.
  10. Don’t be a slave to the nature study resources or books; make them work for you, your family and your part of the world. Have an array of choices which you can dip in and out of when you spot birds in your garden, trees on your walk or insects crawling along the wall in your yard!

NICOLE DAY - Books and Coombe 037

Let them once get in touch with nature and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight and habit through life – Charlotte Mason

 

They’re Watching You!

 

October nauture study 008

Don’t worry that children never listen to you; worry that they are always watching you – Robert Fulgham

 

The following post is an excerpt from ‘Moments on mothering

Who we are and what we say, what we do and how we play out our lives is really important to our children. Every day we influence and greatly impact the little lives in our homes and hearts – but often without even realising the longevity of our loving leadership.

A big part of my life is spent facilitating my children’s learning. We’ve been home educating for almost 9 years and my greatest thrill is seeing my children thrive in their learning, especially when we’re ‘off the clock’. I’m a huge lover of nature study; I frequently point out beauty with authentic awe and wonder on any journey; from picking up milk from the corner shop to a family hike in the Warwickshire countryside.  One of my greatest learning influences is an 18th century educator called Charlotte Mason, she put great emphasis (as many have done since her) on children spending lots of time outside; observing God’s incredible creation and making their own connection with what they see.

October nauture study 016

I can often teach and share life with my children but with very little immediate feedback, and then just like that your 18 month old wanders out into the garden and by using baby sign language tells you there’s a ‘bird’ whilst she watches the sparrows tap for worms on the lawn. And just last night I was out in the car with Nyah; she stopped me mid conversation and said “mum, look at the moon; it’s majestic”. It’s not merely that we suggest to our children what’s important to observe and commentate on, but we do it ourselves; we live it, we breathe it, we experience it and they see all.

And what if we saw all of life this way, what if we saw mothering as a plethora of perception, a nullah of noticing and a flowing river of recognition; how we live our life is how they will live theirs. Their lives may take on a different shape, but an oval is just a circle slightly squashed right? We can’t get away from the fact that our children will end up a lot like us.

12th Aug 2015 045

 

The hard thing is seeing the reality of our frailties and imperfection when we were hoping for momentary deflection. But hiding isn’t an option and neither is sitting on that pedestal. Our children need truth telling and wholehearted dwelling. They need to see conflict and wrong actions forgiven. They need blatant veracity and loving tenacity knowing that real is the raw deal but it’s within our capacity to feel and to heal.

I tell my children that I’m hopelessly flawed, very much human and I ask for forgiveness, regularly. The scandal of grace is in my face, every day and I drink it in. There’s no shame in taking the blame for what they do and say, but we have to be quick to forgive ourselves and remember tomorrow is another day.

Robert Fulghum said “Don’t worry that children never listen to you; worry that they are always watching you”; and as much as I endeavour to daily win my children’s hearts through what I say and what I do, they certainly don’t miss a thing.

Your life and choices are important to your children’s day dreams and life schemes, so you’d better watch your back mama, they’re watching you!

 

Screenshot_2015-10-27-08-18-40-1
Moments On Mothering – Reflective inspiration from one mother to another by Leah Boden

Winter Poetry

Winter Poetry Header

Out of the bosom of the Air
Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken,
Over the woodlands brown and bare,
Over the harvest-fields forsaken,
Silent, and soft, and slow
Descends the snow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Poetry can be,  without a doubt, daily delectable soul food but so many of us archive it in the school classroom ‘box’ in our brain alongside uncomfortable uniforms (in the UK anyway) and long days in a cold classroom.

Shaping our home education around Charlotte Mason’s philosophy of education has not only brought to my attention the importance of poetry in my children’s lives but also in mine. I read at least one poem a day for pure enjoyment; my older children write a long one out over a week for their copy work and we use lots of beautiful poetry alongside our nature study.

I  love seasonal poetry; it can inspire us in any season, but I think we particularly need it during these long, dark days! So here are 10 of my favourites for the winter season, feel free to add your own in the comments or on the Facebook page.

Ten Of My Favourite Winter Poems:

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind – Poem by William Shakespeare

Snow-Flakes. (Birds Of Passage. Flight The Second) – Poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Winter-Time – Poem by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Sky Is Low, The Clouds Are Mean – Poem by Emily Dickinson

January – Poem by John Updike

Woods in Winter – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

First Snow – Mary Oliver

Snow and Ice Poems – Roger McGough

Winter Stores – Charlotte Bronte

The Snowman – Wallace Stevens

 

Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquillity – William Wordsworth

 

5 Tips For Winter Nature Study

January 13 nature walk 001
Lichen: a simple slow-growing plant which typically forms a low crust-like, leaf-like, or branching growth on rocks, walls, and trees

An observant child should be put in the way of things worth observing – Charlotte Mason

Winter can be the most challenging time to get outside. In my early days of using the Charlotte Mason method we would revert to living nature study books in the warmth of my home more than heading out and observing it for ourselves. This was mainly due to my limited understanding of what was going on in nature in winter and my lazy, sluggish winter mode of not wanting to wrap babies up in a billion layers so they didn’t freeze whilst we hugged bare trees!!

Now, with slightly older children, warmer coats and a growing enthusiasm for the great outdoors I think winter nature study is becoming a favourite of mine.

January 13 nature walk 016

So, if you’re struggling to pull on your boots and head outside here are a few tips to get you mama’s motivated!

5 Tips For Winter Nature Study

  1. Check the weather and try plan ahead of time; if you can see a clear day coming cancel usual  ‘lessons’ and spend a good few hours roaming the countryside (with a flask of hot chocolate!).
  2. Wear the right clothes; there’s nothing more frustrating than your 5-year-old crying 10 minutes into the walk “I’m cold, I can’t feel my toes”. I highly recommend layers, hats & gloves and definitely a couple of pairs of wool socks.
  3. Do your research before you go so you know what to look for; beauty isn’t so obvious in winter but it’s definitely there. It’s a good idea to give your children a ‘heads up’ of what you’re looking out for as well as their own general observations.
  4. Take photos so you can sketch later – it’s hard to draw when your hands are cold! I print out pictures of our snaps the next day for the children to re-live and sketch in their journals.
  5. Visit places where you might visit in the spring/summer so your children can observe and appreciate the seasonal differences. I tend to go to 2 or 3 places over and over again so we can closely observe the change in seasons, learn the familiar trees and flowers and also the children get to learn the routes!

January 13 nature walk 003

5 Things To Look For In Winter

January 13 nature walk 025

  1. Moss, fungus and lichen – so beautiful, colourful and textured; often hidden so dig deep in the woods.
  2. Nibbled nuts and pinecones; signs of birds and squirrels enjoying their winter diet. Observe which trees you found them under.
  3. Space; when there are no leaves on the trees, woods and forests always seem much bigger; you can see the sky and through the trees for miles ahead.
  4. Tree shapes. Again, when the trees are bare you can clearly see their shape and structure – simple outline pencil sketches of these are a great way to journal this winter observation.
  5. Sound. Stand still and quiet in the middle of the woods or countryside area and count how many different sounds you can hear. It’s quite a discipline for little children but worth the try!

January 13 nature walk 038

 

January 13 nature walk 019

Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating, there is really no such things as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather – John Ruskin

January – A Winter Walk

New Year 2015 008

It is infinitely well worth the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather, to cherish in them, the love of investigation – Charlotte Mason

New Years Day 2016 020

New Year 2015 012

January is here, with eyes that keenly glow, A frost-mailed warrior striding a shadowy steed of snow –  Edgar Fawcett

New Year 2015 016

New Years Day 2016 014

January is the quietest month in the garden, but just because it looks quiet doesn’t mean that nothing is happening.  The soil, open to the sky, absorbs the pure rainfall while microorganisms convert tilled-under fodder into usable nutrients for the next crop of plants.  The feasting earthworms tunnel along, aerating the soil and preparing it to welcome the seeds and bare roots to come –  Rosalie Muller Wright

New Years Day 2016 047

New Years Day 2016 021

Bare branches of each tree
on this chilly January morn
look so cold so forlorn.
Gray skies dip ever so low
left from yesterday’s dusting of snow.
Yet in the heart of each tree
waiting for each who wait to see
new life as warm sun and breeze will blow,
like magic, unlock springs sap to flow,
buds, new leaves, then blooms will grow
–  Nelda Hartmann

New Years Day 2016 019

New Year 2015 046

Let them once get in touch with nature and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight and habit through life – Charlotte Mason

New Year 2015 027

New Years Day 2016 052

All content on this website including but not limited to photographic work is protected under copyright laws. Copyright © 2016, Leah Boden, Leahboden.com

5 Ways Charlotte Mason Has Impacted My Life #themasoneffect

Processed with VSCO with t1 preset

We should always have something worthwhile to think about, that we may not let our minds dwell upon unworthy matters – Charlotte Mason

My interest in the life and works of Charlotte Mason stems from early on in my research before embarking on actually teaching our children at home.

I often still feel in the early stages of discovery but have now been implementing her methods in our homeschooling days for 8 years. My interest isn’t purely to aid my ‘teaching’, I am fascinated by a woman who influenced the face of education in a time where children were ‘seen and not heard’, were physically punished for poor spelling and did not have the freedom to express their informed opinions or feelings about a particular text or subject. Charlotte’s work and life was ‘for the children’s sake’; she believed and fought for the plain fact that ‘children are born persons’ and wanted to give them all an opportunity to create a life long love for learning,  enjoy good ‘living’ books and an appreciation of God’s creation.

In 2012 I took a bit of a pilgrimage up to the Lake District (Ambleside) to visit her old stomping ground (she was actually nearly fifty when she moved to Ambleside, in 1891 and formed the House of Education, a training school for governesses and others working with young children) and her gravestone; I was saddened to see the buildings unloved and more or less abandoned over the years but glad they remained standing to tell some of the tale of her life and work. Her incredible legacy has and continues to impact so many of us across the globe.

college
‘Scale How’ – Charlotte Mason’s ‘House of Education’ from 1894

My learning about her life and implementing her educational methods in my home have made a huge impact on many area’s of my life; here are 5 for starters!

Reignited my love of books

Let their books be living books, the best that can be found in liberal supply and variety – Charlotte Mason

I’ve always been a reader, albeit a bit of a lazy one, but I’ve always loved and thrived on self-education (I wasn’t home educated). Over the past few years my love of reading, learning and getting lost in real, ‘living’ books has been rekindled and has enriched my life incredibly. I’m a true believer in modeling for our children what we’re labouring to implement in their lives; if you want readers, be a reader!

sign
The plaque on the front of Scale How

Habits are worth the work

“Let children alone… the education of habit is successful in so far as it enables the mother to let her children alone, not teasing them with perpetual commands and directions – a running fire of Do and Don’t ; but letting them go their own way and grow, having first secured that they will go the right way and grow to fruitful purpose.”
― Charlotte M. Mason

Don’t skip this bit! I know habit-forming can be laborious, tedious and time-consuming but it is SO worth it. It’s incredible how doing the same thing every day, learning a simple skill (i.e. attention) can massively impact your family life and your personal life.

beehive
A building known as ‘the beehive’ used for Miss Mason’s students to practice teaching in!

Every day nature study – brought it to life

Let them once get in touch with nature and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight and habit through life – Charlotte Mason

My childhood was full of nature walks and adventures in the Yorkshire countryside; my foraging mother would collect treasures, smell trees, point out flowers and admire God’s beauty like no one I’ve ever seen before. I’m so thankful for that heritage but it didn’t come to life in me until I started home educating my children and brought nature study into our regular rhythm. I have now become my mother (smile), only ten times ‘worse’ – and I love it!

I’ve learnt to trust the learning ability of a child

“Self-education is the only possible education; the rest is mere veneer laid on the surface of a child’s nature.”
― Charlotte M. Mason

This is a whole blog post in itself (I will do it), I never fully realised the full learning potential of a child if you just give them room to grow, discover, observe and breathe in this big beautiful world that we live in. With each child I have been ‘braver’ to not have every moment scheduled and schooled, to allow plenty of room and trust the ways of a child and Charlotte’s method. I’ve had incredible ‘results’ from my brave ways (wink) and thriving children who I thank God for everyday!

door
The front door of Scale How – the beginnings of a great adventure for many young wannabe educators

Mother culture – exploring my own learning and creativity

“If mothers could learn to do for themselves what they do for their children when these are overdone, we should have happier households. Let the mother go out to play!”
― Charlotte M. Mason

With the combination of Charlotte Mason, Brene Brown and now Elizabeth Gilbert, I’m finally loving my creative self, believing in her and leaning into her. So much of motherhood is time given over to those in our households; loving, nurturing, feeding, nursing and guiding but I’ve learnt to realise that I am at my best from a place of rest! I need to renergise, read, write, walk, gaze at beauty and fill my soul in order for me to pour into the people in my life.

So mama’s – let’s go out to play!

How has the life and works of Charlotte Mason impacted your life?