It’s a frog’s life!

IMG_0037

“‘Is the spring coming?’ he said. ‘What is it like?’ …
‘It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine, and things pushing up and working under the earth.’”
—Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

The picture above was the scene that met us last week as we gathered with our friends for our weekly homeschool sports session; as my older children were lost in dodge ball I took a stroll over to the moat of the old castle ruins with my younger children and a few of their friends. The water is still and teaming with life; in a seemingly small, inner city park we’ve witnessed so much beauty through the changing seasons and this day was no different.

Before reaching the dense area of water we could hear the day time croaking and creaking from the army of frogs gathered; I can only imagine how loud and intense the evening sounds must be. The sheer amount of frogs congregated in one area was astonishing; they were moving amongst each other; climbing, nudging, tumbling, competing and yes, mounting – or as many of the children that day beautifully commented, they were ‘hugging’.

Collections of spawn were beginning to form and congeal around these incredible creatures; some drifted towards the bank but it also moved along as the frogs shifted in the water. As the children disappeared to play one by one I was left mesmerised by God’s awesome creative genius and knew I had to come back to photograph the amphibians in greater detail.

IMG_1996

The following day, around the same time my youngest daughter and I returned to the same spot to be met with more than double the amount of frog spawn – this army were hard at work.

We watched quietly, listened to the sounds and took photos with our eyes and camera of these sacred moments of life from the water below us.

We don’t just merely study ponds, water, movement and life; may these late winter observations bring refreshment to our souls and respect for God’s earth and creation. Let’s never think we’ve ‘seen it all before’, may we absorb our observations like a new day, a beautiful sunrise or a moment of reprise in our day to say ‘thank you’ and create a lasting memory.

IMG_1995

The frog by nature is both damp and cold,
Her mouth is large, her belly much will hold;
She sits somewhat ascending, loves to be
Croaking in gardens, though unpleasantly.

John Bunyan

We love these beautiful stories by Angela Sheehan, try to get your hands on a copy of ‘The Frog‘ – a wonderful living story of a frogs life!

51pc+G1oZ3L._SL500_

To Walk And To Wonder – Words & Pictures

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 041

Every hour spent in the open is a clear gain, tending to the increase of brain power and bodily vigour, and to the lengthening of life itself – Charlotte Mason

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 047

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 038

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt ― Margaret Atwood

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 036

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 015

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more”
― George Gordon Byron

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 010

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 005

“Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 043

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 138

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature – the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.”  ― Rachel Carson

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 139

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 107

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 084

“…and then, I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?” ― Vincent van Gogh

Why We Nature Journal

Nature journal 1

As soon as he is able to keep it himself, a nature-diary is a source of delight to a child. Every day’s walk gives him something to enter: three squirrels in a larch tree, a jay flying across such a field, a caterpillar climbing up a nettle, a snail eating a cabbage leaf, a spider dropping suddenly to the ground, where he found ground ivy, how it was growing and what plants were growing with it, how bindweed or ivy manages to climb – Charlotte Mason (Vol. 1, p. 54)

Nature study is such a central part of the Charlotte Mason philosophy, allowing our children to be free to experience the great outdoors on a regular basis, to breathe in God’s creation and makes connections of their own is foundational to the methods we use.

Keeping a nature journal or diary is a wonderful way to help our children (and ourselves) deepen the connection with what they have seen and experienced out-of-doors. Nature journaling doesn’t require us to have a degree in fine art, a perfect knowledge of all things in nature or the most expensive tools and paints; nature journaling requires a little bit of time, attention and a lot of heart.

The Four R’s Of Nature Journaling 

Nature Journal 2

We journal to:

REFLECT

Reflecting is a form of asking questions of what we’ve seen and the connections we’ve made; we can make lists of what we’ve observed, copy out sections of poetry or prose that relate to our observations or a short entry on how our time out-of-doors made us feel. Nature study is not a mere page in a science book describing the facts of another living being, nature study is a beautiful opportunity for us to make a connection for life with part of God’s creation.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 130

RECORD

Nature study, especially for our younger children is a wonderful foundation for all scientific study and research. Our journaling process can be the beginnings of learning about the parts of a flower, the life cycle of a frog or the fascinating phases of the moon. Allow your children to develop their own style, fill their pages with wonder and not get too perfectionist about it!

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 041

RESPOND

Our connections with God’s creation can cause a physical, emotional or spiritual reaction (or all three); my heart leaps with joy when I see a baby lamb skip, a spring crocus pushing up through the hard winter ground or the sight of Mr. and Mrs. Blackbird busy in my yard building their nest. Our journal can mark our emotions through the seasons, bring joy and spark gratitude.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 126

REMEMBER

Sketching, tracing, copying, writing or even sticking magazine pictures in our journals mark a seasonal journey of what we’ve observed through the year. What a wonderful, memorable collection of words and images to look back on through the years of our precious lives and our children’s education at home.

MARCH 18 NATURE WALK 132

Keeping a nature journal has been part of the rhythm of our home educating for the past 8 years but more recently it has become a part of my own personal life; my creative expression as a mother and educator but most importantly as a lover and appreciator of God’s creation.

You can follow my photo journal here on Instagram